The reverse private equity model

Private equity shops are known for buying businesses on the cheap, taking them out of public markets (if they were listed), trimming costs, often throwing the baby with the bathwater by eliminating investment and cutting beyond what makes the company’s product valuable, then loading with debt and then reselling the thin equity slice at a premium based on inflated valuations based on short term accounting effects, which is rarely a good deal.

I think a mirror strategy could work well, as well as being compatible with virtuous and constructive investment:

  1. Buy the minimum stake required to control (change management) a distressed but salvageable listed company
  2. Change management and/or business plan (as normal)
  3. Cut dividends if any, announcing no dividends until turnaround
  4. Reinvest all the cash flow into repaying debt and/or reinvesting in the business
  5. Book capital investments as expenses as much as accounting regulations allow to reduce earnings
  6. Watch the price sink as earnings are zero or negative for the few years that the turnaround requires
  7. Buy more shares at depressed prices (ideally below price paid at #1)
  8. When turnaround complete, watch earnings go positives, reinstate dividends, etc
  9. Sell the fit business at a premium when price as converged with fundamentals

(Inversions from classic private equity shown in italics.)

It’s a form of arbitrage of both classic investor expectations and statistical arbitrage automated strategies that both (over)value short term earnings maximisation, to whom the business will look worse than it really is during the “buy more shares” phase. And as a long term strategy it should be pretty good to other parties like customers and employees.

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