The small oil short

I’ve been an oil bear since last year, which has worked out quite well so far. It may be a good time to summarise my case. I should have written about it earlier, as it’s starting to become mainstream!

Demand and supply

On the demand and supply front, the big shock is increased from US shale. This is well known, but it seems to have taken some time to make an impact. Besides, many US exploration ventures are funded by a lot of debt, so not flexible as they could be — they’ll keep pumping as long as operational cost are break even. Exploration and setup costs are sunk costs, and leveraged structure prevent waiting for better times. Rapid technological improvements in extraction add to the price pressure.

Shale also applies to natural gas, which has seen it’s own supply boom, likely taking market share for some oil applications (NG vehicles?). For electricity, renewables have been getting from insignificant to a minor player, which is also more competition.

On the demand side, it seems merely steady, or facing downward pressures (“China”, austerity). With all that no surprise the price has to come down.

Besides known reserves are vast on a human lifetime scale. If we keep facing static or slowly increasing demand, speculative exploration could be totally suspended for thirty years or more, and the world would be unlikely to run out. This is a challenge to new exploration, which is merely adding to the glut.

Politics

On the politics side cartel agreement seems harder to obtain than in past cycle bottoms. US producers and OPEC agreeing seems very improbable. Even the recent partial deal between Russia and Saudi Arabia — keeping production at the current relatively high level — might be difficult to maintain as producing more to compensate for lower revenue per barrel will be a temptation difficult to resist.

Climate change policies may work out in reducing demand (at least some).

Cycle timing

Commodity cycles — over-investing when prices are high and under investing when they are low — tend to be quite long (5-10 years) as it requires project planning to flow through to reality on the ground and there’s lot of inertia around.

There are several signs of not being at the bottom, like high volatility, media interest, bullishness of traditional oil sector investors although this may be turning.

A strong contango (higher prices on contracts for future deliveries) is a sign of probably excessive hope, and keeps supporting production at above-spot prices — until it doesn’t.

The money shot

Not making any precise forecast, but let’s say that WTI is probably going to stay in a range $20-$35 until at least the end of 2017, with perhaps short lived escapades on both sides of the range.

Back to the trading floor

This post is really just an excuse to make a portfolio update less boring: in addition to selling BP and Total, as previously discussed, I’ve sold Petrofac. Although they seem well equipped to survive a downturn, the market will probably ignore that for a long while (the name of the company may be a curse). I’ve added more Amec Foster Wheeler, which is a more diversified (and further diversifiable) engineer at a distressed price (hence being underweight in the portfolio).

This is despite not being supposed to do significant sector bets in the Obliquity portfolios, but I make an exception in order to minimising regret: I’d be pissed if I’m right on oil while owning sector losers. It’ll be easier to accept missing a sector rebound (if possibly costly).

On the trading front, I’m short contango and long crude carriers (the speculators will need storage, while the carriers’ share prices have been moving down with oil) via options.

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