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Monthly Archives: May 2016

A little add-on to the London Stamps portfolio today, with write up before buying for once.

Titon Holdings is a little window fittings manufacturer, seemingly on a good enough path, especially relative to its valuation. It passes all my small caps criteria and there’s really not much to say about it, which is fitting. The main risk seems that their products or sales fall behind the competition, mitigated by down to earth management.

It’s particularly illiquid (7% on the LSE, 3.5% according to my broker’s live quotes) which I like as that can be unlocked if the company grows gently or is taken over — which seems pretty plausible here given the market segment and unchallenging valuation. Maybe it is worth a TON.

Unusually it’s an AIM style stock listed on the main market (thus stamp duty applies). I wonder if that might help making it less visible, although it shouldn’t matter. Quick scan with a screening tool finds half a dozen companies (>£1m profit, <£20m market capitalisation, LSE Main Market). Nothing on racy valuations here. Might be a dusty corner worth monitoring (although with Creightons and now Titon I’m well exposed to this segment now).

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The recent discussion about high denomination banknotes has extended into the merit of paper cash.

In so far as paper cash is needed, does it need to be done the old school way? For buying goods in legal market, probably not, an alternative would be to use “bearer numbers” (implemented as QR-code or barcode) that could be printed on paper if people want that.

The way it would work would be something like:

  • ATMs are replaced by an online banking facility that debits the client’s account, credits the bank’s account at the central bank (or whoever is the barcode cash clearer), which in response issues a new random number associated with the amount. The number is printed in computer readable form on a ticker the punter puts in their wallet.
  • In a shop the punter shows the number (the ticket) which the cash register redeems with the central bank computer. A new number is issued for change and printed on the receipt. These numbers can then be spent at other shops.
  • People can also simply give away the printout to others, as long as the recipient trusts the giver not to spend a copy before them.
  • Splitting a ticket would require an online app similar to the shop’s cash register.

This reproduces something similar to paper cash but without the need for actual ATMs with a stock of high value banknotes, or a banknote printing and processing infrastructure.

The principal disadvantage is that it requires all non-trusted-parties transactions to be online, to check the value and validity of the number with the centralised issuer/redeemer computer system.

The issuer could be a Bitcoin-like system — you can indeed do all of the above with Bitcoin — though current blockchain technologies add a delay to transaction authorisation that’s impractical for most shop-style settings.

It could be argued this is less anonymous than paper-cash because all redeeming transactions are logged (like in Bitcoin).  Technically that could be done with current cash as well: banknotes have serial numbers that could be tracked to produce interesting meta-data — a government could easily mandate the use of some scanner widget in the cash registers of all legal businesses.

So, I’ve totally failed to follow my “blog before trading” rule these last couple of months. Maybe at a cost. Let’s catch up.

Obliquity London

Regular maintenance here, exiting Rexam which is (very slowly) being taken over by American competitors. Big mergers tend to be overpriced, though the long regulatory process has forced them to sell some assets which may mitigate that. But I’m not keen on having US mid-cap positions in this portfolio where they’re expensive to trade — although I have kept Steris when it reverse merged into UK-based Synergy Health last year.

A mid-cap position in Sthree, a plain regular classic quality-style recruiter was added to the portfolio. Exposure to the recruitment sector, along with Manpower, is probably complete now.

Stamp collecting

The position in Ascent Resources was halved during a speculative spike on news they might be taken over. This is a single project natural gas rights in Slovenia, from a notoriously accident prone company with a long history of failed projects — hence a discount to fair value, I’m betting.

The one remaining project has been stuck in a regulatory and funding conundrum for year and they’re making noise it might unlock this year. The takeover attempt produced a spike in the price, with hindsight it may have been better to sell the entire stake but now it’s gone back to earth I’ll sit and wait in case it either works out (the project start producing gas and the shareholders are not completely diluted) or perhaps more likely there’s another speculative spike.

The corporate structure is interestingly convoluted: Henderson Investors (and a few minority partners) own about £10 million of convertible loan notes (used to keep the company on life support while waiting for permitting to progress all these years) that they can convert to shares (at 100 shares per pound of loan value) thus diluting current shareholders to about 20% of the company. But if they did exercise in full, they’d own the company outright, which is unlikely to be either legally possible or simply desirable for fund managers. So in an exit they may have to negotiate their stake at above the loan value but possibly below the theoretical full dilution value.

Penguins on a beach

Investors in Falkland Islands Holdings waiting for returns.

On a more rule-based adjustement, I doubled the position in Falkland Islands, a most eccentric mini-conglomerate which has been perennially cheap. They’ve sold their oil shares and are reducing Falklands exposure, which is just retail and services by now, probably changing name, so might decouple from being seen as an oil-linked stock which might help towards a re-rating, perhaps. The rule triggered here was to either sell or re-weight positions falling below 50% of target.

I couldn’t resist adding to my collection of falling knives with Snoozebox, who also incidentally have some of their container rooms stuck in the Falklands. The already depressed price sank after the CEO departure and a profit warning with the dreaded “going concern” notice.

I think they had a good concept with very poor execution: the original container rooms were not adapted to short term events, their core proposition, as the cost of moving them and setting them up will be too high. Current management understands that they need to redeploy this stock of container rooms on semi permanent assignments, and do the event accommodation business with more appropriate products, which they have just finished developing (foldable trailers, inflatable rooms). They’ll need funding to scale the latter, and or support the legacy business if it doesn’t get enough tenants to break even. Failure and/or dilution is a clear possibility, but success is also possible and it’s now priced as an option with odds towards failure. The price sank further the day after my first buy, possibly on a sell recommendation from Investor Chronicle, so I added up some more.

On the art of knife juggling

It may be too early: falling knives are probably better caught when they start getting better, after a few years, as it not only avoids those who sink straight down, but the market seems to have memory of the failure and to take time to accept good news after a few years of poor results. This would combine well with my new “net income > £1m” rule (here catching things emerging from losses). I will still keep this position as the trading spread is huge and I’d be upset if it does recover quickly, but I should perhaps avoid that in the future. Having blogged it first might have helped moderate speculative urges, as would perhaps being fully invested (so that buying something requires selling something with worse prospects). Thankfully my position sizing for small caps is very modest.