Brexit: a blessing in disguise?

Perhaps more surprising than the results itself was the market’s reaction to Britain’s exit from the European Union: for such a momentous event, it was very mild, not getting materially out of recent trading ranges, and with the FTSE100 (though a poor proxy for the British economy) back where it was before the vote at the time of writing, with only the rather modest GBP re-rating remaining material.

Portfolios almost unchanged

I couldn’t find any noticeable distressed prices in my watchlist(s) and only sold Panmure Gordon, in the Stamp collection, on the grounds that being a small broker focussed on the London small cap market may not be very promising, as business is delayed or shifts to other places. Companies I hold are are biased towards exporters and¬† otherwise not UK-centric stocks, which has worked reasonably well despite the London listing bias.

Is the market right?

Is the market dominated by trading noise, or is it successfully predicting that Brexit will have little negative impact? Uncertainty will certainly be there but the outcome is hard to predict. Negative scenarios are all other the press, but one can imagine a few positive ones as well:

  • On consumer confidence, ex-UK consumers will probably ignore it, or plan holidays to the UK. UK consumers might prove stoic, optimists perhaps balancing pessimists. It’s hard to imagine that it wouldn’t at least slow down the housing market (in transaction volumes if perhaps not prices).
  • Business investment should be down, from some plans being frozen or moving elsewhere, though the outlook seemed pretty positive before the vote, down a bit from there may remain positive.
  • Sterling devaluation, if it persists, which is not a given, may help a bit. It could also remain at a sweet spot: big enough to help but small enough not to trigger enough inflation for the Bank of England to have to tighten monetary policy. Indeed, business investment slowing down may be all the tightening that’s needed.
  • Last but not least, there may be positive impact from EU re-focussing (see below).
Doc Marteens with Union Jack toe

Britain kicks arse? (credit: I Ransley via Flickr)

The European Union becomes the Eurozone

A potential positive side-effect of Brexit is that it might help refocus the European Union on improving its institutions, in particular finishing off building the Eurozone.

The United Kingdom was perpetually only half-way in, making the whole system an unwieldy variable geometry construction, both adding complexity and slowing down integration as exceptions piled up, and other member states had a strong incentive to get their own special case deals. When membership was irreversible this made sense, but if it turns out leaving has a precedent, that is not an unmitigated disaster, then there’s a way out. Then, variable geometry need not be inside the EU but between EU membership and the various forms of association around it (e.g. Norway or Switzerland style deals).

This enables the EU to become the Eurozone: the Eastern European states are committed to join; Denmark is de-facto in economically as they operate a fixed exchange rate system with the Euro; Sweden entry seems permanently suspended due to a failed referendum, but then they, or other reluctant members, could choose to either come in or leave and get a UK style deal.

So we have both a simpler and clearer framework institutionally, and an incentive to escape the current deadlock on Eurozone construction, as the choice between further integration or dismantlement becomes clearer and clearer. If this works out, it could be of great benefit to everybody, including the UK, which would be (much) better off with prosperous partners.

As a short term little bonus, if some business, financial or otherwise, moves from London to the continental financial centres, it’s a mini-Keyneysian stimulus programme for the Eurozone, which may help accelerate the recovery process.

Maybe the whole world will in the end need to thank UK voters for their selfless, if unwitting, sacrifice.

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